He Said/She Said, Erin Kelly – Book Review

I received He Said/She Said in exchange for an honest review

Erin Kelly is an author who I’ve meant to read for years – I’ve actually had her debut The Poison Tree sat on my shelf for longer than I can remember. I finally got around to trying this author when this new release popped up on Netgalley, and I loved it.

He Said/She Said, Erin Kelly

The story starts as Kit, a serial eclipse chaser, is leaving his pregnant wife Laura behind to see the 2015 eclipse abroad. The writer takes us back in time, to the first eclipse the couple watched. At a festival in Cornwall years earlier, the two witnessed their first eclipse together, but they also witnessed a brutal attack on a girl named Beth, which changed the course of their lives forever. Continue reading

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Filed under Book Reviews, Psychological thriller

A Man Called Ove, Fredrik Backman – Book Review

I naturally seem to gravitate towards psychological thrillers and dramas and, recently I realised that my reading had got quite dark – just over the past couple of months I’ve read books covering murder, cults, incest and more. A Man Called Ove was my attempt to change that – I was looking for something heartwarming and humorous, and this was perfect. I really enjoyed this book.

A Man Called Ove

Everyone has someone a little like Ove in their lives. He doesn’t mince his words, he’s a stickler for rules and he’s the epitome of the term ‘stuck in their ways’. He’s only driven one brand of car his entire life, and he can’t quite understand why anyone would want to do any different. Each morning, he walks a circuit of his neighbourhood to check for burglaries, even though one has never occurred in the decades he’s lived in the area. But scrape back the curmudgeonly veneer you’ll find a softer side to Ove. Continue reading

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Filed under Book Reviews, Comedy, Drama

Foxlowe, Eleanor Wasserberg – Book Review

I received Foxlowe in exchange for an honest review.

Using a naive young protagonist as our narrator, Eleanor Wasserberg peels back the layers of what life may be like living within a small commune or cult, realistically portraying the effects of brainwashing from a young age and what can happen when one follower stands out from the crowd.
Foxlowe, Eleanor Wasserberg

There’s something distinctly chilling about Foxlowe right from the opening lines of the first chapter; “Tiny red beads came from the lines on my arm. These soft scars gave way like wet paper.” It’s told from the point of view of Green, a young girl growing up in Foxlowe, a mansion housing a commune within the English countryside. Isolated and sheltered from society, the ‘Family’ (as they call themselves) have developed their own set of rules and way of living; they believe the Bad is everywhere Outside, where people have become corrupted by money and power. They live self-sufficient lives, growing their own crops for food and creating artwork which they sell at local markets to raise money. There’s echoes of paganism in their rituals, living right by the ‘standing stones’ they mark the Solstice twice a year, and celebrate the harvest of that autumn brings. Continue reading

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Filed under Book Reviews, Drama, Psychological thriller

The Roanoke Girls, Amy Engel – Book Review

I received The Roanoke Girls in exchange for an honest review.

The Roanoke Girls had everything I wanted – a mystery set in a sprawling farmhouse mansion, dark family secrets and complicated relationships. But it won’t be for everyone. This book deals with some extremely serious, dark and disturbing subject matter – to call the Roanoke family dysfunctional would be a huge understatement. If you’re a reader who is triggered easily, I’d perhaps suggest you avoid this one, but if you like your stories dark, twisted and multi-layered then read on.

The Roanoke Girls, Amy Engel

The ‘secret’ of the Roanoke family is revealed quite early on, but I’m not going to spoil it here. Because, to be honest, if you knew the subject of this book, it could put you off reading. I actually think this book is one that is best when the reader goes in fresh, and just soak up the characters and atmosphere for yourself. Because, if you’re anything like me, it will suck you in completely. Continue reading

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The Wonder, Emma Donoghue – Book Review

Since reading Room years ago I’ve followed Emma Donoghue closely and read a number of her books, but I’ve never found one which could top the Booker-nominated, film-inspiring sensation that was Room. But this one come pretty damn close. I’m not sure I’d say The Wonder quite surpasses Room, but it stands in its own right as a riveting piece of historical fiction.

The Wonder

The story takes place in middle Ireland, a few years after the Great Famine. Lib Wright, an English nurse who trained under Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War, is called to the area to take an unusual position. Her ward is Anna O’Donnell, an eleven-year-old who who has supposedly not eaten a morsel of food for four months. Lib is required to simply watch the young girl, and report her observations to a committee after two weeks. Continue reading

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Filed under Book Reviews, Drama, Historical, Mystery

Stacking The Shelves (February 17th)

stackshelves

The rules of Stacking The Shelves

  • Participants are to create their own Stacking the Shelves post and link back to Tynga’s Reviews so more people can join the fun!
  • Posts can be laid out any way you want.
  • The host site posts updates on a Saturday but bloggers taking part can post any day they choose.
  • Visit Tynga’s Reviews on a Saturday and add your link.
  • Visit other participants sites to find out what they have added!

It’s been a month since I’ve taken part and they’ve gone and stacked up again without me noticing. Here’s mine for this week!  (Click the covers to go to Goodreads).
Continue reading

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Filed under Book Memes, Stacking The Shelves

Hold Back The Stars, Katie Khan – Book Review

I received Hold Back The Stars in exchange for an honest review.

Hold Back The Stars was a beautiful, unusual book. It blends multiple themes and genres – science fiction, a utopian future and a romance – split between earth and space. But the heart of this story is definitely romance – a story of first love and two people whose relationship is strong enough to challenge the status quo.

Hold Back The Stars

We meet Carys and Max as they’re floating in space with ninety minutes of oxygen left in their tanks and no way back to their ship. As the minutes tick away, the star-crossed lovers try everything they can think of to get back to safety. It’s tense, edge-of-your-seat stuff from the very first page. Continue reading

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Filed under Book Reviews, Futuristic, Romance

Eleanor & Park, Rainbow Rowell – Book Review

I’ve heard nothing but good things about Rainbow Rowell but I tried her adult novel Landline a few years ago and couldn’t see what the fuss was about. I’m so glad to say I finally get it. Eleanor and Park was such a touching tale of love between two high school misfits, it was impossible not to enjoy and I whizzed through it in just a couple of days.

Eleanor & Park, Rainbow Rowell

A modern day high school Romeo and Juliet, Eleanor and Park meet on the bus to school. They’re both from very different backgrounds; Park lives in a nice house with his parents who are still very much in love, whilst in Eleanor’s house there is never quite enough to go around – she doesn’t even have a toothbrush. But her financial problems pale in comparison with her abusive stepdad.

Park struggles being a half Korean kid in a predominantly white neighbourhood, but he grew up in town and he gets by just fine with his friends on the edge of the ‘cool’ crowd. When Eleanor turns up on the schoolbus, with her wild red hair and bizarre clothes, he thinks she’s a disaster waiting to happen. He can’t understand why anyone would draw attention to themselves that way, when he’s spent so much of his life keeping his head down and trying to fit in. Continue reading

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Filed under Book Reviews, Romance, Young Adult

The Book of Mirrors, E.O. Chirovici – Book Review

I received The Book of Mirrors in exchange for an honest review

“I remembered the title of Flynn’s book and the maze of distorting mirrors you used to find at carnivals when I was a kid – everything you saw when you went inside was both true and false at the same time.”

This book left me with mixed feelings. The writing style felt slightly unnatural to me, almost devoid of emotion and more just a relaying of various facts about the characters’ lives. Each of the main narrators had their own romantic entanglements but I really struggled to care about them, and, to some extent, all of their voices felt very similar.

The Book of Mirrors, E.O. Chirovici

But, on the other hand, this psychological thriller has an intelligent, strong, multi-layered plot which, despite some issues with the narrative,  was enough to carry it through and keep me avidly reading. Continue reading

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Filed under Book Reviews, Crime, Drama, Psychological thriller

The Bear And The Nightingale, Katherine Arden – Book Review

I received The Bear And The Nightingale in exchange for an honest review.

This book took me a little out of my comfort zone; set in another time and place, with a strong undercurrent of fantasy. It left me in a strange situation, where I didn’t really get along with the story – but I can’t quite put my finger on why. The writing was beautiful, the author weaves elements of religion, mythology and fantasy amongst a story of a very likeable young girl. And yet it wasn’t quite for me.

The Bear And The Nightingale, Katherine Arden

Set in the historic wilderness of Russia where winter stretches most of the year and the country is ruled by Grand Princes, this story follows a family in a small village as they forage for food and share fairytales together around the fire to keep warm at night. The protagonist is Vasya, a headstrong young girl who has a touch of magic in her genes. Vasya is almost at one with the Russian wilderness; she understands every nook and cranny of the forest from a young age, and she can see things which others can’t. Continue reading

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Filed under Book Reviews, Drama, Fantasy, Other Countries